Fight Club’s 8 Rules for Writing that Creates a Ruckus

Fight Club’s 8 Rules for Writing that Creates a Ruckus

You know those writers you admire who are crazy, creative and ready to change the world?

Have you ever wondered what it takes to be a writer like that?

Well the truth is they all belong to a secretive, invitation-only club that’s as uncompromising as anything Tyler Durden could dream up.

It’s called Write Club.

While insomnia and a brash, slightly crazy alter-ego aren’t requirements for joining, you still must adhere to some rules.

(Don’t worry; not talking about the club isn’t one of them!)

Noticeably lacking in mischief, mayhem, and soap, the eight rules of Write Club offer a no-BS look at common pitfalls that ail many writers, and their blunt styling is something even Chuck Palahniuk can appreciate.

If you’re looking to make this whole content thing work for you and wish to avoid being the all-singing, all-dancing crap of the world, make sure you follow them closely.
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317 Power Words That’ll Instantly Make You a Better Writer

317 Power Words That’ll Instantly Make You a Better Writer

Ever noticed how some writers have an uncanny ability to toy with your emotions?

Within the span of a few pages, you can go from shaking with excitement to bawling your eyes out to flying into a rage and throwing the book across the room. It’s the hallmark of great writing, proof of mastery of the craft, and the yardstick by which aspiring writers measure their work.

And it goes beyond storytelling.

Sure, taking the reader on an emotional roller coaster ride is essential in novels and short stories, but what about emails, resumes, blog posts, proposals? They’re all designed to influence the reader in some way. You want to pass along information, yes, but you also want the reader to feel a certain way about that information.

Maybe you want to impress them, get them excited, make them cautious, get them angry, encourage them to keep going, or any number of emotions. The better a job you do at making them feel, the more influential you are, and the better your chances of getting what you want.

So, you might wonder… how?

The world is full of people who can scribble down their ideas, but to bring those ideas to life, to make them take up residence in the mind of the reader, lurking in the background, tugging, pulling, and cajoling their emotions until they think and feel exactly as you want? That’s a rare skill indeed.

The good news is it can be yours. There’s even a shortcut.
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Daniel Day-Lewis’ 4 Tips for Writers Who Aspire to Greatness

Daniel Day-Lewis’ 4 Tips for Writers Who Aspire to Greatness

Do you ever wonder how long it will take you to make it as a writer?

If you care about your craft, you probably think about this a lot. Sometimes it may even keep you up at night.

Of course, if you write, you’re already a writer. But I’m talking beyond that. I’m talking about moving people and having an audience that supports your ideas.

Writing is a tough (perhaps the toughest) creative endeavor. It takes many years to hone your skills to move people with words alone. Years of publishing posts you think are good… only to realize that you’re being ignored.

But despite all this, you’re committed. You’ve invested in building a blog and learning the multitude of tools that support and enhance your work. And you’ve accepted that success won’t happen overnight.

While facing this harsh reality, what can you do to nurture the artist within, to prevent yourself from going insane during this long, daunting journey, to remove fear from your writing and think clearly?

The answer: craftsmanship. Treating the pursuit of mastery not as a distant finish line of 10,000 hours, but something you will do until your last breath. Allowing it to transform you on every level.

We are in an amazing moment. Writing has never held more potential. Writing has never had more power. Writing has become the ultimate craft for those willing to plant their butt in the chair and expose their heart and soul.

To share stories, adventures and adversity.

To move people.

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The Brain-Dead Simple but Astonishingly Effective Way to Become a Better Writer

The Brain-Dead Simple but Astonishingly Effective Way to Become a Better Writer

Write better posts.

Go to any site about blogging and you’ll see some variation of this advice.

Need more trafficWrite better posts.

Want more commentsWrite better posts.

And on the surface, it sounds like sage advice.

But when you think about it, it’s kind of like a track coach telling an athlete:  “If you want to win an Olympic gold, run faster.”

Well thanks Captain Obvious, but the problem isn’t a lack of effort.

I mean, raise your hand if you’ve ever sat down in front of your computer and intentionally written a bad blog post.

Thought so.

Write better posts might be great advice for the occasionally lazy blogger with a gift from the writing gods, but what are the rest of us supposed to do?

You know, we mere mortals who are willing to work our butts off and spend the hours it takes to produce great content but need a little help with the how.

The good news is that those great writers and artists who seem to have had their talent handed down from above didn’t start out great.

In fact, many of them only got there by using a dumb technique that you can shamelessly steal.

And it’s so brain-dead simple, you’re going to wonder why the hell you didn’t work it out for yourself.
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Why You Shouldn’t Create a Newsletter (and What to Do Instead)

Why You Shouldn’t Create a Newsletter (and What to Do Instead)

Can I be blunt with you for a moment?

Not just direct, but say some things that’ll make some people mad?

Because you see, the world has changed.

Once upon a time, the online newsletter was the goose that laid golden eggs. Instead of hammering poor, unsuspecting website visitors into buying a product or service on their first visit, businesses got smart and asked them to subscribe to their newsletter, gaining permission to follow up again and again, sneaking in little sales pitches with every newsletter, and creating a nice flow of sales every time they published a new issue.

It was a game changer. Businesses went from converting 1-2% of visitors to an astonishing 5-20%, not because of a better pitch or product, but simply because they could stay in touch, educate the prospect, and occasionally nudge them to see if they were ready to buy.

And the best part?

It cost almost nothing. You could shoot out a new edition of your newsletter to thousands or even tens of thousands of people whenever you wanted, as often as you wanted, for a couple hundred bucks (or less) per month.

The result: enormous profits. Not just for big corporations, either, but for Main Street businesses, stay-at-home moms, and savvy writers around the world who wanted to make a living from their words. It was (and is) one of the biggest and most important changes in business in the last decade. More