Motivation

49 Creative Geniuses Who Use Blogging to Promote Their Art

49 Creative Geniuses Who Use Blogging to Promote Their Art

Note from Jon: I talk to a lot of bloggers who’d love to spend more time painting, storytelling, photographing, or some other creative pursuit, but don’t, because they feel it’s not pragmatic. And that’s sad, because it can be. Just as a blog can build buzz around a book or business, it can also be used to promote your art.

Regardless of your passion, you’ll find someone in Leanne’s list you can use to inspire your own success. I also urge you to download The Rebel Artist’s Manifesto. It’s free, and it’ll give you one extra kick in the butt to get you started.

You’ve watched artists, performers and writers like Hugh McLeod, Amanda Palmer, Chase Jarvis, and Jeff Goins sell boatloads of creative work thanks to the platforms they have built from their blogs.

You tinker with your own creative projects and wonder if you could use a blog to promote them too.

But despite all the blogging advice out there, you sense that blogging for art is different.

You know you don’t want to be spammy, but have no idea how to use a blog to sell those musical compositions, show tickets, short horror stories, family paintings with Fido, or handmade grandfather clocks.

The one thing artists need to be successful today

The Internet has turned selling creative work on its head.

No longer can you simply get good at your craft and then find someone to champion you, manage you, or sponsor you.

Want a publishing deal? You better have built a solid fan base for your work first.

Want a chance at a record deal or even just make a decent side income from your work? You’ll need an engaged audience and good-sized list.

For today’s artist, building a tribe is non-negotiable.

But how?
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An Open Letter to Writers Struggling to Find Their Courage

An Open Letter to Writers Struggling to Find Their Courage

Do you feel that?

That little tugging sensation on your heart?

You’re not sure what, but something is pulling you to change. Not in a confess-your-sins-oh-ye-sinners way, but to shift directions, to embrace your calling, to finally do what you were put here to do:

Write.

You feel the ideas inside you. You sense them straining to escape. You know your job is to set them free, firing them like a cannon into a world in desperate need of them.

But you’re afraid.

You’re afraid of quitting your job and living without a safety net. You’re afraid of the concerned, disapproving looks your friends will give you when you tell them you’re giving it all up to write for a living. You’re afraid of not having enough money for food, of the power being cut off, of watching your family shivering and hungry, all because of your “selfishness”.

And most of all?

You’re afraid you’re wrong about yourself.

Maybe that tugging sensation you feel is just an illusion. Maybe your ideas are crap. Maybe you’re just a fool with delusions of grandeur, and this whole fantasy of becoming a writer is just that: a fantasy.

So, you do nothing.

You cower in your safe little job. You tinker with a blog or a novel or a screenplay. You drown your dreams with junk food or booze or shopping sprees, all the while telling yourself you’re doing the right thing.

But are you?

“No,” a little voice whispers inside of you. “No, this is all very, very wrong.”

Oh God…
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An Open Letter to All the Bloggers Cluttering the Web with Forgettable Content

An Open Letter to All the Bloggers Cluttering the Web with Forgettable Content

Have you ever gotten an email from a reader who said your writing changed their life?

How about other bloggers? Are they still talking about a particular post years after you published it?

Or is it the opposite?

Visitors just seem to come and go, never commenting, never linking, never sharing, just quickly scanning your posts and then moving on, forgetting about you forever.

If that’s the boat you’re in, I certainly sympathize, but brace yourself, because what I’m about to say will be painful:

You’re not trying hard enough.

Yes, I know those are impossibly high standards. Yes, I know it takes everyone time to learn their craft. Yes, I know there are only a few dozen bloggers in the world who can answer yes to both of those questions.

But if you’ve been blogging for a year or two, and you still can’t answer yes to either of them, then Houston, we have a problem.

Fortunately, it’s a problem we can fix. Let’s start by going back to where it all started. More

5 Silly Ways You’re Sabotaging Your Blog without Even Realizing It

5 Silly Ways You’re Sabotaging Your Blog without Even Realizing It

Now, now, now. Don’t even try to pretend it isn’t true.

Let me guess…

You spend hours on Twitter and Facebook “working,” only to wonder later if you really accomplished anything.

You comment on the blogs of bigwig bloggers, telling yourself you’re “networking,” nevermind that none of those comments actually lead to anything.

You have a growing collection of books and courses promising to teach you all the secrets in the universe, but they sit in that “to be read” folder collecting dust.

In the back of your mind, you know you can do better. Technically, you even know what to do.

But something inside you refuses to let you, and every day you struggle with whether or not you should just give up or find some other shortcut.

You know how I know this?

Because I’m you. More

Suicide, Shame, and the Painful Truth about Accomplishing Your Goals

Suicide, Shame, and the Painful Truth about Accomplishing Your Goals

I was in agony.

Waves of pain unimaginable shot down my spine, causing every muscle in my body to contract as if I’d been shocked with 20,000 volts of electricity. My back arched up at an unnatural angle. My arms and legs began to shake.

One moment, I was on a webinar talking to a few hundred people about traffic, walking them through exactly how to build a popular blog. The next, everything went dark. I was still conscious, but just barely.

Underneath the layers of pain, I remember thinking, “You can’t pass out. You have to finish talking about how to build an email list.” Of course, the pain was so bad I’d forgotten how to freaking see, much less pontificate on the intricacies of opt in pages.

So, I stopped. I waited a few seconds. My vision slowly returned, and I was able to wiggle the mouse up to the “Mute” button again.

For the next several minutes, I just sat there, quivering and trying to catch my breath as waves of pain continued up and down my spine. Eventually, the pain receded somewhat, and I wiggled the mouse back up to the “Mute” button again.

“Sorry folks,” I said. “Looks like GoToWebinar is having some technical difficulties. Can everyone hear me now?”

They said they could. We finished the webinar. Immediately afterward, I went to bed and stayed there for the next 16 hours.

And the worst part?

It was a normal day. I’d nearly collapsed on several webinars, not just that one. You might’ve even been on one of them.

Part of me worried if I was about to die. Another part hoped I would, just to be free of the pain.

I was at the end of my rope. One way or another, things were about to change.

Hold on, though. Let’s back up a bit. More